Wedding canceled

A woman with terminal brain cancer has told of her devastation after her fiance dumped her just a week before their wedding.

Emily Nicholson, 24, from York, saw her weight soar by five dress sizes within six weeks after she began taking steroids as part of her treatment.

The aspiring model moved to Australia in 2012 where she worked as a bar manager and club promoter before being diagnosed with astrocytoma brain cancer in February 2016.

In spite of the disease, Emily and her then-boyfriend Jamie Smith, 24, had already began making plans to get married when she was given the devastating news in January 2017 that she had just a year left to live.

The once slender size 6 claims Jamie called off their engagement just one week before they were set to get married using Facebook Messenger – a claim he denies.

Emily Nicholson, 24, from York (pictured with ex-fiancé Jamie Smith in hospital) began making plans for a bucket list wedding after she was diagnosed with terminal cancer
Emily Nicholson, 24, from York (pictured with ex-fiancé Jamie Smith in hospital) began making plans for a bucket list wedding after she was diagnosed with terminal cancer
Emily (pictured before her diagnosis) gained 5 stone within just six weeks due to steroids taken as part of her treatment, and was later dumped by her fiancé
Emily (pictured before her diagnosis) gained 5 stone within just six weeks due to steroids taken as part of her treatment, and was later dumped by her fiancé

Emily, who gained 5 stone as a result of treatment for her tumour, initially planned to wed Jamie in August 2016 but the couple had to postpone their wedding until March 2017 because she needed surgery.

The pair also discussed freezing Emily’s eggs so she could one day have IVF if she recovered.

Speaking about the moment she received the message from New Zealander Jamie, saying he wanted to ‘call it a day’, Emily says:

Jamie messaged me and said he didn’t want to be with me and he hadn’t loved me for a long time. 

It was horrendous. He made it very clear that he didn’t love me. I felt it was because of the way I looked and what had happened. 

Now I don’t feel anything about him, he hurt me but there’s no point getting upset over it. I’ve just had to be strong about it all.

She added;

He told me he didn’t love me anymore. For months he’d been going out with his friends but obviously I couldn’t do that.

We were looking to build our lives together in the time we had left.

 

Emily (pictured right with Jamie) was convinced Jamie called off their marriage because of her appearance and what happened 
Emily (pictured right with Jamie) was convinced Jamie called off their marriage because of her appearance and what happened

 

Emily says Jamie had been going out with his friends for months before he ended their relationship via Facebook Messenger (pictured)
Emily says Jamie had been going out with his friends for months before he ended their relationship via Facebook Messenger (pictured\

 

Doctors discovered Emily (pictured left with friends after her diagnosis) had Astrocytoma after she began suffering from seizures
Doctors discovered Emily (pictured left with friends after her diagnosis) had Astrocytoma after she began suffering from seizures

Emily and her family settled in Perth, Western Australia in the hopes of starting a new life in October 2012.

Emily’s mother Joanne Nicholson, 51, who became her full time carer recalled how a series of seizures led to the diagnosis of brain cancer Astrocytoma.

What is an astrocytoma? 

Astrocytomas are the most common type of primary brain tumour within the group of brain tumours called gliomas, according to The Brain Tumour Charity. Primary means they have originated from the brain instead of spreading from elsewhere. About one third of all brain tumours diagnosed in the UK are astrocytomas.

They grow from a type of cell in the brain called an astrocyte, which is the most abundant cell in the brain. They support and protect the neurons (nerves) and help to pass messages between them. Astrocytes, therefore, are vital in processing information in the brain.

Emily was doing so well, she had her own house and a good job as a bar manager and she was also picking up work as a model and nightclub host. 

She was vivacious, fun loving and a bit wild. She’s always been a ferociously hard worker. 

She was blossoming, she loved life and now it’s all gone. 

When she kept having seizures, we just thought it was stress because she was working so hard.

When we went into the doctor’s office and he told us our world just fell apart. 

I look back and think how did we even get home? I remember breaking down crying, Emily looked at me and asked me to help, and there was nothing I could do. 

‘I had no power and everything was taken out of our hands.’

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