Nigerian conman

A Nigerian prince accused of bamboozling hundreds of job seekers out of thousands of dollars by promising them high-paying gigs appeared in Manhattan court Thursday with a special request.

Osmond Eweka, 31, asked a judge in the case for permission to travel to Nigeria for the upcoming birth of his child. The judge will determine next month whether or not to approve.

Photos captured by DailyMail.com inside the court show an eager Eweka speaking with his attorney while dressed in a navy suit and a navy polka tie for his appearance.

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The Manhattan District Attorney’s Office said the royal and his friend, Kamel McKay, 27, pretended earlier this year to run two consulting firms in Manhattan telling clients that if they paid a fee they would be placed at various jobs across New York City.

Prosecutors said some of the jobs Eweka and McKay promised their victims were for hotel housekeeping and front desk receptionists. The men used the popular job-seeking website Indeed.com to find them.

Osmond Eweka, a Nigerian prince, (pictured sitting center) is accused of scamming New York job seekers out of thousands of dollars by promising to find them work. He wants to travel to Nigeria for the birth of his baby
Osmond Eweka, a Nigerian prince, (pictured sitting center) is accused of scamming New York job seekers out of thousands of dollars by promising to find them work. He wants to travel to Nigeria for the birth of his baby
Osmond Eweka, left, dressed in a navy suit and a navy polka tie for the court appearance Thursday in Manhattan
Osmond Eweka, left, dressed in a navy suit and a navy polka tie for the court appearance Thursday in Manhattan

According to court documents, Eweka and McKay used office space in the Empire State Building and another building on fifth avenue to run two bogus employment agency firms, Stamford Consulting Firm and Howard Consulting Group.

They also used fake names, according to the New York Post.

Eweka went by the name Sean Jackson and McKay reportedly used the name Tyrone Hayes.

Prosecutors said they would invite their victims to their office for an interview and then have them pay a fee, ranging between $300 and $700, the Post reports.

Prosecutor Catherine McCaw said they told victims the fee would cover the cost of uniforms, training and background checks.

They also said that paying the high fee would result in higher-paying jobs.

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‘But in reality, there was no such job,’ she said at Eweka’s arraignment on Thursday in Manhattan Supreme Court.

After collecting the money, the men would send the job seekers to different businesses, where they were turned away by employers who weren’t expecting them.

The victims then found that they could no longer get in contact with the alleged fraudsters or the consulting firm.

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